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Shekhawati Painting

Updated: Jul 6, 2022

Shekhawati's various temples, havelis, forts, baoris, and shrines have been home to innovative and unequaled wall painting abilities for generations. Churu, Jhunjhunu, Sikar, and Nagaur are the key districts of Shekhawati, which have been the backbone of commercial business in India for centuries.



About Shekhawati Paintings


Shekhawati is less well-known than other districts of Rajasthan, but it is known for its wonderful painting work on Havelis, which enhances the beauty of royal houses in numerous ways. The vibrant paintings remind us that Shekhawati used to be home to individuals who enjoyed painting on the walls. You must visit enchanting places like Sikar – known for its clock tower, painted Biyani havelis, and large market – and the beautiful Nawalgarh with its fine frescoes, some exceptionally beautiful havelis belonging to the prosperous Marwari era of the 19th century, before the rich historical and cultural heritage is lost in the dust of time.


In effect, whereas some havelis had abstract motifs that were most likely painted during the Mughal era, others feature images portraying Europeans that were most likely painted during the British era.


Traditional Indian subjects, such as mythological sceneries and local folklore, were, however, very popular.


Making of Shekhawati Paintings


The towns of Shekhawati effortlessly integrate Rajput and Islamic architectural traditions, and the region's defining feature remains its abundance of gorgeously painted havelis. The apartments in Shekhawati haveli architecture are typically arranged around a central courtyard, similar to a Moroccan riad, which helps to keep the intense heat at bay while also separating male and female residents. The number of rooms and courtyards, as well as the intricate decorating of arches and frescoes, grew in line with the merchant's riches over time. Large havelis, such as the enormous Char Chowk ki Haveli, indicate the merchant's grasp of the town's business dynamics.


Until the late 1940s, these ornate, private residences served as emblems of the traders' success, and they are still visited by a few interested visitors today. Shekhawati: The Havelis of the Merchant Princes, a freshly published and lavishly sumptuous book, also pays tribute to them (Marg, 2013). Abha Narain Lambah, who had produced a Regional Conservation Plan for Sikar district in the Shekhawati region, is the book's editor.


Theme of Shekhawati paintings


Until the late 1940s, these ornate, private residences served as emblems of the traders' success, and they are still visited by a few interested visitors today. Shekhawati: The Havelis of the Merchant Princes, a freshly published and lavishly sumptuous book, also pays tribute to them (Marg, 2013). Abha Narain Lambah, who had produced a Regional Conservation Plan for Sikar district in the Shekhawati region, is the book's editor.


Final Thoughts


As beautiful as these centuries-old structures are, many of them have been abandoned as families who formerly called them home have relocated to larger cities in search of money and corporate expansion. A lot of them have been sold or destroyed to make way for more practical and simpler to maintain housing. Some have been gentler to their former residences, choosing caretakers who also serve as guides, allowing tourists to tour the homes from top to bottom.



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